Events and Awards

About

Saying something is ‘neuroscience’ is equivalent to calling it ‘rocket science’. It is both an endorsement and derision at the same time. While everyone has a brain and we all spend our day thinking about what is going on in other’s heads, the actual workings of the brain and the mind are understandably impenetrable. With that being said, the brain is undeniably fascinating, it is the most complex object humanity has come across in the universe. The brain is what lets you read this sentence, it generates our understanding of the world and all the amazing things humans do to fill it.

Floating Brains

So how do we get at the brain? That is where WCNeuro throws it’s hat in the ring. Through experimental psychology and neuroscience, our knowledge of the brain grows every day, but that knowledge is at conferences and in scientific journals but when it is distilled to the mass media a certain flavour of the work is lost. What if there was a podcast where we train you to understand scientists as scientists speak?

Juliane Flanigan

Juliane Flanigan

Doctor

Dr. Flanagan is an Assistant Professor in the Addiction Sciences Division of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. She received a B.A. in psychology at the University of Vermont in 2003 and an M.A. and Ph.D. in clinical psychology at the University of Tennessee 2011. She completed her clinical psychology internship training at the Seattle VA and a NIDA-funded postdoctoral fellowship at the Yale University School of Medicine.

Matthew Broome

Matthew Broome

Professor

Matthew has a particular interest in a brain imaging modality called magnetoencephalography (MEG). MEG involves measurement of magnetic fields at the scalp surface that are generated by current flow through neuronal assemblies in the brain. 

Joe Galea

Joe Galea

Doctor

Dr Galea is broadly interested in motor control. This ranges from the neural correlates of motor learning to stroke rehabilitation. At present, he is particularly interested in how reward/punishment influences our actions and can be used to alter the speed at which our motor system learns or retains new movements.EEG.