WCNeuro S1, EP8, Andrew Bagshaw – Sleep patterns in the scanner

As humans we sleep for over a third of our time which comes to a third of our lifetime and yet this episode’s guest estimates we are still a few hundred years off having a complete understanding of what our brain doing while we are sleeping. We aren’t even talking about dreams here but just the biological functions our brain does when it is resting. You see the brain never truly rests, it always active but during sleep, and the stages of sleep, we find the brain does a great deal of housekeeping but ultimately the precise nature is tricky to unfold.
In this interview we go through how disturbing sleep effects us, can electronic disturb sleep, how our brain works in different ways under sleeping conditions and also how your sleeping preferences effect your day to day life. If you just want the science without a whole sleep program being subscribed to you then downloading this episode is a smart move.
For more on Andrew Bagshaw please see our Floating Brains page on https://watercoolerneuroscience.co.uk/
For more information on episodes, polls and extra content please check out Https://www.patreon.com/WCNeuro
Tags: sleep, REM, slow wave sleep, epilepsy, Rolandic epilepsy, neuroscience, night owl, early riser, rest, Andy Bagshaw

WCNeuro S1, EP8, Andrew Bagshaw – Sleep patterns in the scanner
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S1, EP7, Stephane de Brito – Psychopaths debunked

Of all the clinical disorders in the world none is more famous than psychopathy. They are a perfect stock villain for movies capable of being an unfeeling thug, a sadistic serial killer or Machiavellian mastermind all on a writer’s whim. How close does that get to the actual reality? Popular culture has plenty to say about psychopaths with movies, tv shows, documentaries and plenty of books which tell you all you would ever want to know but have you ever listened to a bona fide expert cut through the myths? This episode brings psychopathy expert Stephane de Brito to the microphone to go through the myths and realities of psychopaths. We also go into how psychopathy cannot be seen in children nor how merely being anti-social to the point of violence is enough either. Want to know more, then download and get ready for psychology on psychopathy and conduct disorder. This episode even ends with a grisly tale.
For more on Stephane de Brito please see our Floating Brains page on https://watercoolerneuroscience.co.uk/
For more information on episodes, polls and extra content please check out Https://www.patreon.com/WCNeuro
Tags: psychopath, psychopathy, sociopathy, anti-social personality disorder, conduct disorder, criminal psychology, offending, Stephane de Brito

S1, EP7, Stephane de Brito – Psychopaths debunked
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WCNeuro S1, EP6, Stephen Mayhew – Teaching your brain’s neurons about your brain’s neurons

EEG or electroencephalography was one of the first neuroimaging techniques. Used as a technique in research for around a century EEG was fundamental in building our knowledge over the 20th century on the brain’s electrical behaviour and how it transmits information across the different parts of the brain on a millisecond timescale. With those praises being said EEG has some incredible flaws which have pushed the field of neuroscience to look for better and better methods to use in the lab. Yet here we are in the early 21st century and no neuroimaging lab would be complete without an EEG kit ready to be used.
We bring back neuroimaging expert Dr Stephen Mayhew to explain how the brain’s structure even allows for EEG to be possible, we go over what it does and how it works. We also have a special segment at the end on the future of neuroimaging where more advanced techniques called magnetoencephalogry and optical
For more on Stephen Mayhew please see our Floating Brains page on https://watercoolerneuroscience.co.uk/
For more information on episodes, polls and extra content please check out Https://www.patreon.com/WCNeuro
Tags: neuroscience, EEG, MEG, OPM, magnetism, electrical, psychology, imaging, tutorial, Stephen Mayhew

WCNeuro S1, EP6, Stephen Mayhew – Teaching your brain’s neurons about your brain’s neurons
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WCNeuro S1, EP5, Stephen Mayhew – A crash course in fMRI

fMRI or functional magnetic resonance imaging was one of the great inventions of the 20th century. It revolutionised medical fields allowing for examination of the body without the need to cut someone open. Equally neuroscience moved from a field constrained either to understanding the brain through surgery (hardly the same as in day to day life) or with EEG which only measured coarse electrical signals. With fMRI second by second imaging from inside the brain of a living, responding person was in grasp and after decades it is now a common place technique in dozens and dozens of neuroimaging labs across the world.
But how does it work? Could you even hazard a guess? This episode brings in neuroimaging lecturer and expert on EEG and fMRI Dr Stephen Mayhew to provide a tutorial on fMRI. We go through it step by step from the atoms that have to be aligned and provoked to even get the signal all the way to a laymen’s explanation of how a brain image is generated for displaying on the evening news. While WCNeuro can’t promise you’ll be a qualified operator by the end you will know the ins and outs of one of the marvels of the modern age.
For more on Stephen Mayhew please see our Floating Brains page on https://watercoolerneuroscience.co.uk/
For more information on episodes, polls and extra content please check out Https://www.patreon.com/WCNeuro
Tags: neuroscience, fMRI, MRI, functional magnetic resonance imaging, psychology, imaging, tutorial, Stephen Mayhe

WCNeuro S1, EP5, Stephen Mayhew – A crash course in fMRI
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WCNeuro S1, EP4, Suzanne Higgs – Social vs personal appetites

Food is part of all human society, there is nowhere in the world you can go which does not have its own unique cuisine. For every people sitting down and sharing a meal is a cornerstone of society and having a meal cooked for you is a deep sign of care and love. With food being so important to humanity how we think about it should naturally be a subject of study. In this episode professor of eating behaviour, Prof. Suzanne Higgs, explains how our eating behaviours change under social pressures. We see differences in the amount of food we eat, what we eat and how we feel about what we eat all change simply down to if someone is around us.
For more on Suzanne Higgs please see our Floating Brains page on https://watercoolerneuroscience.co.uk/
For more information on episodes, polls and extra content please check out Https://www.patreon.com/WCNeuro
Tags: food, cuisine, eating behaviour, social psychology, healthy eating, Suzanne Higgs

WCNeuro S1, EP4, Suzanne Higgs – Social vs personal appetites
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WCNeuro S1, EP3, Damien Neadle – A walk through Ape Culture

The Cambridge Dictionary defines culture as “the way of life, especially the general customs and beliefs, of a particular group of people at a particular time:” It is easy to see how this pertains to any group of people at any time, even our most ancient ancestors had cave drawings and stories from times of being huddled in dark caves scared of the monsters outside and with no idea of the discovery of fire that was to come. It could also mean animals if you apply the most rigorous logic to it even the most basic of animals. In an interview with PhD researcher Damien Neadle we discuss apes and how culture works for them. Despite what most people believe apes do have culture in their everyday life, but it is a very different kind to culture to ours. Apes do not share information in the same way we do, they do not teach in the same way we do, and each new generation of apes can be as devastating as a hard reset for their culture.
Want to know in what way? Well tune in as we look into how our closest relatives on the evolutionary tree handle the most important part of our lives, culture.
For more on Damien Neadle please see our Floating Brains page on https://watercoolerneuroscience.co.uk/
For more information on episodes, polls and extra content please check out Https://www.patreon.com/WCNeuro
Tags: animals, apes, monkeys, psychology, comparative psychology, Damien Neadle, culture

WCNeuro S1, EP3, Damien Neadle – A walk through Ape Culture
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WCNeuro S1, EP2, Jackie Chappell – Psychology from the birds to the bees

While we have the most impressive cognitive system we have seen and the brain is arguably the most complex object in the known universe, with so many connections and neurons the Milky Way would need twice as many planets and stars to match it, it is not the only brain on the planet. Nearly all animals have some form of nervous system and many do show awareness of their surroundings and the ability to plan and shape the world to their needs. While obviously not as advanced as humanity who have altered every place we have ever come across animals do show a remarkable amount of varying cognitive abilities and yet it is only one of hundreds of fields in the mega subject known as ‘Psychology’.
An interview with Dr Jackie Chappell dives into her intensive experience with animal cognition from insects to mammals and birds showing how each evolutionary line has found different ways to have enough brain power to survive the world around them. We learn that one line of evolution is way, way smarter than you would imagine and even the tiniest creatures we see can have an amazing level of thinking behind their decisions. This episode also includes an interview on the world famous Betty the Crow experiment which showed one of the first spontaneous occurrences of avian invention.
Listen for more to find out about how animals think and how we even define intelligence.
For more on Dr Jackie Chappell please see our Floating Brains page on watercoolerneuroscience.co.uk
For more information on episodes, polls and extra content please check out Https://www.patreon.com/WCNeuro
Tags: animals, birds, crows, psychology, comparative psychology, Jackie Chappell, apes

WCNeuro S1, EP2, Jackie Chappell – Psychology from the birds to the bees
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WCNeuro S1, EP1, Sarah Beck – Are children actually Creative?

We have all seen children conjure up amazing worlds and imagine themselves knights slaying dragons or astronauts or movie stars with millions of adoring fans. The images they can pluck out of thin air and turn into mindscapes as real to them as this webpage is to you is fascinating and a quintessential part of childhood according to many. But how impressive is that scope of imagination really? Could a child pluck out something never before seen or heard of or are they really more just great at jumbling together scraps from their experiences and creating new wonderful being to play with and strive against during playtime?

Well this episode Dr Sarah Beck dives into the nature of childhood imagination. We discuss how children express creativity and how it differs from adults but we also go deeper. The field of ‘comparative psychology’ is the study of humanity compared to other animals and they how they achieve cognition. This means we have the entire animal kingdom to compare ourselves against and Sarah’s research dives into the rate at which children can imagine solutions to tasks compared to crows which are surprisingly intelligent.

Listen for more to find out about childhood, creativity and its growth throughout our lifetimes

For more on Dr Sarah Beck please see our Floating Brains page on https://watercoolerneuroscience.co.uk/
For more information on episodes, polls and extra content please check out https://www.patreon.com/WCNeuro
Tags: childhood, psychology, development, developmental psychology, Sarah Beck, crows

WCNeuro S1, EP1, Sarah Beck – Are children actually Creative?
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