Floating Brains

Below is a little bit of information about each of our guests

Matthew Brookes

Matthew Broome

Think Fast S1, EP3 – Psychologist Vs Psychiatrist with Prof Matthew Broome

Matthew has a particular interest in a brain imaging modality called magnetoencephalography (MEG). MEG involves measurement of magnetic fields at the scalp surface that is generated by current flow through neuronal assemblies in the brain. Measurement and subsequent reconstruction of these magnetic fields allows generation of images showing current density in the brain, and how that current density changes when our brains undertake tasks. My most recent research has pioneered novel ways to measure brain connectivity (communication between spatially separate brain regions) via the measurement of neural oscillations (“Brain Waves”). These techniques are having a significant impact in multiple clinical fields including schizophrenia and epilepsy.

In all cases our intention is to develop an understanding of the underlying genetics of a disorder so we can work with those making cellular and animal models of the disease to help, both in the understanding of disease mechanisms and to help in the search for treatments. In this regard, we therefore have three types of collaborations: collaborations with clinicians who treat patients with disease, especially colleagues at the Institute of Neurology, but also elsewhere, collaborations with other geneticists to collaboratively analyse such patient material, and collaborations with cell biologists and transgenic mice people to enable them to build good models of disease.

julianeFlanagan

Julianne Flanigan

Dr. Flanagan is an Assistant Professor in the Addiction Sciences Division of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. She received a B.A. in psychology at the University of Vermont in 2003 and an M.A. and Ph.D. in clinical psychology at the University of Tennessee 2011. She completed her clinical psychology internship training at the Seattle VA and a NIDA-funded postdoctoral fellowship at the Yale University School of Medicine.

Joe Galea

Joe Galea

Think Fast S1, EP2 – Where have they been with Joe Galea

Personal website: www.josephgalea.weebly.com

Dr Galea is broadly interested in motor control. This ranges from the neural correlates of motor learning to stroke rehabilitation. At present, he is particularly interested in how reward/punishment influences our actions and can be used to alter the speed at which our motor system learns or retains new movements.

John Hardy

Think Fast S1, EP1 – Where have they been with John Hardy

My research interests are in the genetic analysis of disease. Historically, we have worked on the genetic analysis of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. More recently, we have worked on Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders and, most recently on motor neuron disease. Our early studies were on mendelian forms of disease and these studies continue, but an increasing focus has been on the genetic analysis of complex traits related to disease. Additionally, this latter analysis has made us increasingly interested in population genetics because the risk variants for human traits are likely to be different in different racial groups.

In all cases our intention is to develop an understanding of the underlying genetics of a disorder so we can work with those making cellular and animal models of the disease to help, both in the understanding of disease mechanisms and to help in the search for treatments. In this regard, we therefore have three types of collaborations: collaborations with clinicians who treat patients with disease, especially colleagues at the Institute of Neurology, but also elsewhere, collaborations with other geneticists to collaboratively analyse such patient material, and collaborations with cell biologists and transgenic mice people to enable them to build good models of disease.