Floating Brains

Please find our guests for this series by alphabetic order by surname

matthew Broome

Matthew Broome

Think Fast S1, EP3 – Psychologist Vs Psychiatrist with Prof Matthew Broome

Matthew is an academic psychiatrist and Director of the Institute for Mental Health at the University. He is a leader in the field of early psychosis and in the philosophy and ethics of mental health.

 

Carrie-Cuttler

Carrie Cuttler

Episode coming soon

Research in Dr. Cuttler’s Health and Cognition Lab focuses on elucidating the potentially beneficial and detrimental effects of chronic cannabis use and acute cannabis intoxication. Our current and recent work focuses on examining links between cannabis use and mental health (e.g., depression, anxiety, OCD), physical health (e.g., pain, sleep), stress, and cognition (e.g., memory, decision-making, executive functioning, creativity, attention). Further, we are interested in examining effects of cannabis with different concentrations of THC and CBD as well as effects of cannabis concentrates to better understand their influence on mental health, physical health, and cognition.

 

julianeFlanagan

Julianne Flanigan

Think Fast S1, EP4 – Where have they been with Julianne Flanagan

Dr. Flanagan is an Assistant Professor in the Addiction Sciences Division of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. She received a B.A. in psychology at the University of Vermont in 2003 and an M.A. and Ph.D. in clinical psychology at the University of Tennessee 2011. She completed her clinical psychology internship training at the Seattle VA and a NIDA-funded postdoctoral fellowship at the Yale University School of Medicine.

Joe Galea

Joe Galea

Think Fast S1, EP2 – Where have they been with Joe Galea

Personal website: www.josephgalea.weebly.com

Dr Galea is broadly interested in motor control. This ranges from the neural correlates of motor learning to stroke rehabilitation. At present, he is particularly interested in how reward/punishment influences our actions and can be used to alter the speed at which our motor system learns or retains new movements.

John Hardy

Think Fast S1, EP1 – Where have they been with John Hardy

My research interests are in the genetic analysis of disease. Historically, we have worked on the genetic analysis of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. More recently, we have worked on Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders and, most recently on motor neuron disease. Our early studies were on mendelian forms of disease and these studies continue, but an increasing focus has been on the genetic analysis of complex traits related to disease. Additionally, this latter analysis has made us increasingly interested in population genetics because the risk variants for human traits are likely to be different in different racial groups.

In all cases our intention is to develop an understanding of the underlying genetics of a disorder so we can work with those making cellular and animal models of the disease to help, both in the understanding of disease mechanisms and to help in the search for treatments. In this regard, we therefore have three types of collaborations: collaborations with clinicians who treat patients with disease, especially colleagues at the Institute of Neurology, but also elsewhere, collaborations with other geneticists to collaboratively analyse such patient material, and collaborations with cell biologists and transgenic mice people to enable them to build good models of disease.

Antje Ihlefeld

Antje Ihlefeld

Think Fast S1, EP6 – Where have they been with Antje Ihlfeld

My research interests are in the genetic analysis of disease. Historically, we have worked on the genetic analysis of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. More recently, we have worked on Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders and, most recently on motor neuron disease. Our early studies were on mendelian forms of disease and these studies continue, but an increasing focus has been on the genetic analysis of complex traits related to disease. Additionally, this latter analysis has made us increasingly interested in population genetics because the risk variants for human traits are likely to be different in different racial groups.

In all cases our intention is to develop an understanding of the underlying genetics of a disorder so we can work with those making cellular and animal models of the disease to help, both in the understanding of disease mechanisms and to help in the search for treatments. In this regard, we therefore have three types of collaborations: collaborations with clinicians who treat patients with disease, especially colleagues at the Institute of Neurology, but also elsewhere, collaborations with other geneticists to collaboratively analyse such patient material, and collaborations with cell biologists and transgenic mice people to enable them to build good models of disease.

Remote Testing resource of the Acoustical Society of America mentioned in the episode: https://www.spatialhearing.org/remotetesting/Issues/Issues

Paper referenced in the episode that was published on teaching during the pandemic which is open-access here:

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s43683-020-00008-x

Antje Ihlefeld

Ashley Ingiosi

Think Fast S1, EP7 – The twinkling stars of the brain with Ashley Ingiosi

Dr. Ashley M. Ingiosi is a Ruth L. Kirschstein postdoctoral fellow at Washington State University – Spokane. Her research interests broadly include sleep and glia. She received B.S. degrees in Biopsychology & Cognitive Science as well as General Biology from the University of Michigan. Dr. Ingiosi completed her Ph.D. in Neuroscience with Dr. Mark Opp at the University of Michigan where she studied astroglial- and neuronal-specific contributions to sleep and neuroinflammation. Her current research with Dr. Marcos Frank focuses on understanding the role of astrocytes in sleep and sleep homeostasis using a combination of in vivo calcium imaging and sleep behavior techniques. Dr. Ingiosi is a recipient of the 2019 World Sleep Society Young or New Investigator Award. She was also awarded the Society for Neuroscience Trainee Professional Development Award for her work on astrocytes and sleep. Dr. Ingiosi plans to pursue an independent research position to continue investigating the role of astrocytes in sleep regulation and function.

Website: https://www.ashleyingiosi.com/

Brigitte Lavoie

Brigitte Lavoie

Think Fast S1, EP5 – How your legs work with Brigitte Lavoie

Dr Brigitte Lavoie, PhD is a neuroscientist and an entrepreneur who loves to solve puzzles and find out how systems interact.   She worked for over 20 years in sensori-motor interactions, giving her a keen interest in multidisciplinary research teams.  Following her PhD at Université Laval, Quebec, she continued studying how the brain controls human movements; first at the MRC Cyclotron Unit of Hammersmith hospital / Imperial College in London UK and then at the Centre for Sensori-Motor Interactions of Aalborg University in Denmark.  Her passion for systems neuroscience took her to Southampton where she worked at the MRC Institute of Hearing Research to explore the mechanisms of hearing.  In the past few years, she has combined her passion for science and technology and her desire to generate value from innovation to identify the best way to help innovators reach their goals.  She has founded Afin Ltd (www.agencyforinnovators.com) to support academic and industry innovators who want their biomedical research to progress along the translational pathway.

Papers relating to Brigitte’s work

backward walking2003

backwardwalking2005

Capadayetal1999

Lavoieetal1997

Schneideretal2000

Asaf Marco

Asaf Marco

Think Fast S1, EP9 – Laser precision memory manipulation with Asaf Marco

My scientific endeavor has been dedicated to understanding the molecular and epigenetic mechanisms governing the functions of the brain. My experience has led me to focusing my scientific career to unravel the role of epigenetic mechanisms in non-coding regions, 3D-genome architecture and the molecular biology required in the process of learning and memory and its dysfunction in neuropsychiatric diseases. My work is carried by using transgenic animal models, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and cell cultures, combining cutting-edge technologies in the fields of genomics, imaging, molecular biology, and genome engineering, with advanced computational analysis.

I aspire to utilize my experience, knowledge and training to become an independent scientist as a principal investigator. I have a passion for scientific research and capable of working across multiple scientific disciplines, while assimilating new ideas and methods thoroughly, yet rapidly. Throughout my career I have been fortunate to work with incredible teams from diverse backgrounds, and I am always on the lookout to establish new collaborations with peers from different scientific fields.

Papers relating to Asaf’s work

Comprehensive Mapping of Long-Range Interactions Reveals Folding Principles of the Human Genome

Hippocampal Memory Traces Are Differentially Modulated by Experience, Time, and Adult Neurogenesis -annotated

Epigenetic programming by maternal behavior

Brain cell type–specific enhancer–promoter

 

Toby Pasman

Toby Pasman

Episode coming soon

Toby Pasman is a neurophysiology researcher who graduated from the University of Oregon in 2018 with a Bachelor’s degree in Psychology. He worked on the Emotions and Neuroplasticity Project at the Brain Development Lab while in undergrad, learning EEG acquisition and artifacting. Toby went on to work in the clinical mental health field, utilizing EEG, along with QEEG, transcranial stimulation, PEMF, and neurofeedback technology, the latter of which he has a board certification in. He is currently working on his Master’s of Psychology at Lynn University and running Roscoe’s Wetsuit Podcast, his applied neuroscience and psychology show. His show can be found at his Youtube channel Roscoe’s Wetsuit along with audio versions of the podcast available on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and just about anywhere else you can listen to podcasts.
Study tip: Applying tDCS, a form of noninvasive brain stimulation, to the right inferior frontal and right parietal cortex improved learning rates in a study on 104 subjects, indicating its potential usefulness as a study enhancer.
Brigitte Lavoie

Bryan Roth

Think Fast S1, EP8 – Learning about the structure of neurons with Bryan Roth

Bryan L. Roth MD, PhD is the Michael Hooker Distinguished Professor of Pharmacology at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill School of Medicine.  Dr. Roth was elected to the National Academy of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences in 2014  and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2019.  He has received many honors including the Goodman and Gilman Award for Receptor Pharmacology, the PhRMA Foundation Excellence in Pharmacology Award, a NARSAD Distinguished Investigator Award and the IUPHAR Analytical Pharmacology Lectureship.  Dr. Roth also given more than 20 named lectures including the 2017 Martin Rodbell Lecture and a Presidential Special Lecturer at the 2018 Society for Neurosciences meeting.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32946782/

https://pdsp.unc.edu/rothlab/publications.php